Steady rain changes trail, but training run still possible

15 Feb
Cummins Creek Trail on Jan. 23, 2016, (left) and on Feb. 14. A little rain turns the trail into a shallow creek.

Cummins Creek Trail on Jan. 23, 2016, (left) and on Feb. 14. A little rain turns the trail into a shallow creek.

It’s amazing the difference a little rain will make on an Oregon coastal trail.

I made my second visit to the Cummins Creek Trail in the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area in the past month (the first run can be found here). I had planned a different trail run for Sunday, but there was a fairly steady rain overnight — nothing heavy, just the typical Coastal Oregon rain. And since it was still raining in the morning, I decided to revisit a trail I did know rather than risk a trail I didn’t know.

The narrow, rocky single-track near the highpoint of the Cummins Creek Trail was running with water on Feb. 14, 2016.

The narrow, rocky single-track near the highpoint of the Cummins Creek Trail was running with water on Feb. 14, 2016.

It misted or sprinkled on me throughout the run, but for the first hour or so, the trails didn’t really show any negative effects. Under the towering pines, the forest floor was needle-covered and soft. In flatter areas, the water accumulated in a series of small puddles. But in the steeper sections, the elevation change resulted in water running down the middle of the narrow, rocky, single-track trail.

In fact, one area (shown in the photo above) had turned from a rocky trail in January to a shallow, rocky stream in February. Faced with a 20-yard stretch of rushing water, I wasn’t sure how I’d get down the trail and stay dry. But I found a nearby branch — like a walking stick — and I thought I could pick my way across the high spots. And that worked for about two steps, until the branch shattered, plunging me into the running water. Oh, well. If you’re worried about getting wet, you’re in the wrong place.

I’m learning more about the navigational abilities of my Suunto Ambit2. If you can find GPX versions of your trails, you can download those onto the watch, and let it guide you. TrimbleOutdoors has been a good source of GPX files; I had to sign up for a trial membership to download a few, and I haven’t yet decided that I want to pay the $30 annual membership. AllTrails.com might be another good source, but it, too, has a membership fee.

Cape Perpetua vertical

Cape Perpetua elevation profile, Cummins Creek loop

 

Advertisements

I'd love to read your comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Must Hike Must Eat

Trail stories and recipes from life as a paleo inspired outdoor adventurer.

Poetry In Motion

I'll stand before the Lord of Song / With nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah - Leonard Cohen

Running with Scissors

Careening through life as a mom, runner, ecologist, and writer

Pacific Northwest Life in Photographs

Image your Life with shaneFx

Omni Running

Running for the fun of it

A trail running guy

A journey into running trails and ultra marathons

No Paine No Gain

Runner, writer - follow the adventure.

Hike Mt. Shasta

Exploring the Mount Shasta Region

Just Call Me Shortcut

thoughts from an ENFP who can't seem to stay on course

distance ahead

Ultramarathons.

In the Shadow of the Rockies

Running the trails of Calgary, and beyond

Teton Romeo

Tails from Teton Valley, Idaho

Elevation Trail

ET - STFUP

Racing Through My Life

My Race Reports

wonderjess

where I do it all

Beaverhead 100K and 55K Endurance Runs

Run the remote and rugged Continental Divide National Scenic Trail in the Beaverhead Mountains dividing Idaho's Lemhi River Valley and Montana's Big Hole Valley.

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

One and a Half Runners

Don't be dumb in the first half, don't be a wimp in the seccond

amy c writes

words from a writer, runner and mama of twins

andrealinares

A topnotch WordPress.com site

Tim Tollefson

Trail junkie for Hoka One One; 2014 U.S. 50k Trail Champion; Physical Therapist, Mammoth Performance Lab Director; Coffee addict; Powered SRA Elite and GU; My wife and I have an open relationship with running... Photo Cred: @davidity

Tasharama_A_Go_Go

Musings of a musician turned ultramarathon runner trying to pursue my dreams whilst juggling a professional career and bipolar

iowagirlontherun.wordpress.com/

Running down a dream.

Ultra Runner Girl

Writing about running, war zones, and everything in between

Dan's Marathon

Running long distances across the country

Chasing 42

Life, the Universe, & Running

Ultrarunner Joe

My experiences and insights from out on the trail

Vet runner. clinging onto speed with my fingertips

Running (and the odd episode of cycling) adventures in South East Asia

Jack & Viv

Running, reading and raising a family

Bryan Odeen

give your soul some breathing room

%d bloggers like this: